If you see your glass is half empty, pour it into a smaller glass.

I just read that recently and felt that it was worth noting here as well. Indeed, that’s a powerful concept – the emptiness of expectation, and the fulfillment found in the now. There is deep truth and wisdom in the suggestion. And, that being the case, I’m not sure these words need that much explanation.

But, let me share some thoughts on the day of the final New Moon of the year, auspiciously juxtaposed between the solstice and the year to come.

For many, the year past has been a trying one. Very few that I know are exhilarated with anticipation regarding the prospect of harmony in the world and an immediate end to the suffering we see all around us. In essence, we remain troubled, even if we are hopeful.

And, that’s where I think this phrase has something to offer. It would be far from ideal if while dwelling on the problems and the things yet to be achieved, we didn’t realize and appreciate the beauty that already exists. I’m not suggesting you give up your cause or your efforts for a better life and a better world. But, I am suggesting that you see that the path there is found by shifting your focus closer, to acknowledge and experience the life-giving energy that comes from the relationships in your life that are working now and the love that is evident. That’s the glass that seems like the proper size — not some arbitrary assignment of one that could be, “should” be, bigger; that inevitably depletes us by virtue of its emptiness — the one that reflects the positive energy of the moment. And along with the proper container, we experience a state of fullness, which is the force that’s necessary to propel us forward to reach our full potential, the dream that we all share, of health and happiness for all. From this place of gratitude and appreciation the glass will, in time, effortlessly expand; along the way, we will experience and be sustained by the good feelings that we so dearly need to carry us through the tough times until we get there.

That’s my wish for the New Year — may all beings be completely free of suffering; and may you feel immediately full as you count your blessings now.

Mitakuye Oyasin,
Michael

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